A productive day

That was the idea.  First off – we go to the marie of the commune where Jonah was born, to get him a new birth certificate.  Why – because the one we have is too old.  They expire. They seem to only be good for 6 months or so for official stuff. (I’ve been told this is because in previous times people’s civil changes [marriages etc] were noted right on their birth certificate – so an old one could actually be out dated)
We got there  – I knew where the office I needed – walked towards it.  closed. They’re not open Monday mornings.
Fine.
Off to the Prefecture to get new plates/registration for our car.  We drive downtown and park – walk over and read the sign on the door, which basically said: “due to the current significant 6 week delay in getting car registrations done, we will not be helping anyone here at the office, nor taking any phone calls. Submit your completed dossier with payment and a stamped envelope with all appropriate documents”

Fine.

We’ll go grocery shopping – in which we find probably 50% of what we need.
Fine.

“Hey look – a little battery store. We can replace the dead ones in the keys so the remote entry will work”
No problem. The lady even takes the thing apart – replaces it, presses the button – “look, the little red light goes on now” 5 Euro well spent.
Get out to the car — click.  Nothing. Press press. Nothing. And now the light on the key doesn’t even go on.

Fine.

Oh well – “hey look my student loan has finally been approved”
Oh wait – it’s 1/4 of what they gave me when I did my masters here 10 years ago when we had no kids.  Well that will cover about 3 months of expenses.

Mountains.
Cheese
I can open the door by hand
Bread.
We’ll just go back tomorrow.
Wine
Things take longer because the pace of life is slower.

A Day in Uriage

We spent Saturday waling around the town of Uriage-les-Bains, which is the area we are hoping to find a place to stay.   Uriage is a resort town of sorts- with a thermal-healing hot springs (which also has a line of cosmetic products made form it) and is just a really nice place.   We parked by the school that we hope the kids will go to to see how long of a walk it is down to the Chateau where we were looking at an apartment.  Then we continued down to the town – also partially to see how long of a walk (hike) it is (as we have been informed that some of the best pain au chocolat in the hood comes from the boulangerie in Uriage) There was a bit of a market going on – local artisans: jewelry, woodwork etc.  We had some huge bread-with-stuff-baked-in things that we ate on a park bench – then walked back to the main park. There are ‘petit sulkys’ there for kids to ride around the park  – little pony-bikes. The kids thought that was pretty cool – and it kind of made up for the fact that we had made them hike &/or walk for the past hour in the heat – and were about to make them backtrack their steps – but this time it would be uphill. On the way back to the chateau we walked past the remains of the 1st century AD Roman baths that were built to take advantage of the hot springs.  We were all pretty hot & exhausted by the time we got back to the car – so we came home and let the kids have some time to recuperate – as there were some big plans in store for the evening….

A Day in Uriage

We spent Saturday waling around the town of Uriage-les-Bains, which is the area we are hoping to find a place to stay.   Uriage is a resort town of sorts- with a thermal-healing hot springs (which also has a line of cosmetic products made form it) and is just a really nice place.   We parked by the school that we hope the kids will go to to see how long of a walk it is down to the Chateau where we were looking at an apartment.  Then we continued down to the town – also partially to see how long of a walk (hike) it is (as we have been informed that some of the best pain au chocolat in the hood comes from the boulangerie in Uriage)

 There was a bit of a market going on – local artisans: jewelry, woodwork etc.  We had some huge bread-with-stuff-baked-in things that we ate on a park bench – then walked back to the main park. There are ‘petit sulkys’ there for kids to ride around the park  – little pony-bikes.


The kids thought that was pretty cool – and it kind of made up for the fact that we had made them hike &/or walk for the past hour in the heat – and were about to make them backtrack their steps – but this time it would be uphill.

 On the way back to the chateau we walked past the remains of the 1st century AD Roman baths that were built to take advantage of the hot springs.

We were all pretty hot & exhausted by the time we got back to the car – so we came home and let the kids have some time to recuperate – as there were some big plans in store for the evening….

Chateau de Vizille

Yesterday we took a little drive over to the town of Vizille just down the valley for a little outing in the parc around the chateau.  It was more amazing than either of us had remembered. The chateau itself is magnificent, and the grounds are – well, fit for royalty (go figure) and apparently 100 acres.  There is a huge herd of some type of deer that we watched (former royal hunting grounds), there were geese, swans, peacocks, and what appeared to be a 17th century fish farm.

The kids played tag in a rose-garden maze, and walked leisurely past this chateau as if there were nothing out of the ordinary for it.

The other thing we noticed is that we called it a castle, but the kids heard from their friends “chateau” and when our kids said it, of course they did not have our horrible english accent to their French. So that’s how it’s going to work.  It probably won’t be very long until our children are shaking their heads and apologizing for their parents ridiculous foreign accents.

Chateau de Vizille



Yesterday we took a little drive over to the town of Vizille just down the valley for a little outing in the parc around the chateau.  It was more amazing than either of us had remembered. The chateau itself is magnificent, and the grounds are – well, fit for royalty (go figure) and apparently 100 acres.  There is a huge herd of some type of deer that we watched (former royal hunting grounds), there were geese, swans, peacocks, and what appeared to be a 17th century fish farm.

The kids played tag in a rose-garden maze, and walked leisurely past this chateau as if there were nothing out of the ordinary for it.

The other thing we noticed is that we called it a castle, but the kids heard from their friends “chateau” and when our kids said it, of course they did not have our horrible english accent to their French. So that’s how it’s going to work.  It probably won’t be very long until our children are shaking their heads and apologizing for their parents ridiculous foreign accents.